Meet Joel Christian Gill, 2014 TEDxAmoskeagMillyard Speaker

Meet Joel Christian Gill, 2014 TEDxAmoskeagMillyard Speaker.

View On WordPress

0 notes

Young Bessie Stringfield

A study of the main character of Tales of The Talented Tenth number two.as a child.

Young Bessie Stringfield

A study of the main character of Tales of The Talented Tenth number two.as a child.

whimsicalnobodycomics:

comicsalliance:

CARTOONISTS OF COLOR DATABASE AIMS TO GIVE ARTISTS GREATER VISIBILITY
The Cartoonists of Color Database is a new project by cartoonist MariNaomi that aims to collect information on people of color working in comics. The FAQ succinctly outlines the need for such a database with four statements: “For visibility. For academia. For inspiration. For community building.”
The database formally launched this week with over 700 creator listings, and MariNaomi has made a public call for people to add more information, refine the information that’s currently there, and correct any mistakes.
Artists who want to submit their names to the database can do so via this Google Doc form. That form can also be used to update erroneous information, or anything that’s listed as N/A. In addition to the master list of cartoonists of color, the site has separate lists specifically breaking out LGBTQ, non-male, and non-mainstream cartoonists of color.
READ MORE


So thankful for this!

I found myself!

whimsicalnobodycomics:

comicsalliance:

CARTOONISTS OF COLOR DATABASE AIMS TO GIVE ARTISTS GREATER VISIBILITY

The Cartoonists of Color Database is a new project by cartoonist MariNaomi that aims to collect information on people of color working in comics. The FAQ succinctly outlines the need for such a database with four statements: “For visibility. For academia. For inspiration. For community building.”

The database formally launched this week with over 700 creator listings, and MariNaomi has made a public call for people to add more information, refine the information that’s currently there, and correct any mistakes.

Artists who want to submit their names to the database can do so via this Google Doc form. That form can also be used to update erroneous information, or anything that’s listed as N/A. In addition to the master list of cartoonists of color, the site has separate lists specifically breaking out LGBTQ, non-male, and non-mainstream cartoonists of color.

READ MORE

So thankful for this!

I found myself!

1,133 notes

SPX, Hell Yes!

whimsicalnobodycomics:

Hey Folks-

I’ll be at SPX sharing a table with Dan Mazur (Ninth Art Press). We will be debuting this:

image

I’ll also have this if you haven’t picked it up yet:

image

And my new mini!

image

image

Stop by my table at L10 and say hi!

image

-Whit Taylor

30 notes

Lil Nino Brown my Winsor McKay Little Nemo is no stranger to spx, however Strange Fruit Vol I Uncelebrated Narratives from Black History will debut at L10 with ninthartpress and whimsicalnobdy at @spx. Come on by table L10, and in the meantime take a look at this review:
//www.forewordreviews.com/reviews/strange-fruit-uncelebrated-narratives-from-black-history-volume-1/

dept-of-research-and-development:

I’ve been enjoying Dakota McFadzean’s The Dailies — four-panel comics he draws in his sketchbook every day.
The comics are improvisational exercises, and he recently offered up some advice for writing daily strips, including:

Drawing a comic every day is an exercise, not your magnum opus. It doesn’t have to be funny. It doesn’t have to be anything. Writing good punchlines is difficult, but drawing a few panels of surreal nonsense, or just contemplating a moment can be really fun and enjoyable. 

dept-of-research-and-development:

I’ve been enjoying Dakota McFadzean’s The Dailies — four-panel comics he draws in his sketchbook every day.

The comics are improvisational exercises, and he recently offered up some advice for writing daily strips, including:

Drawing a comic every day is an exercise, not your magnum opus. It doesn’t have to be funny. It doesn’t have to be anything. Writing good punchlines is difficult, but drawing a few panels of surreal nonsense, or just contemplating a moment can be really fun and enjoyable. 

7 notes

dept-of-research-and-development:

There’s a lot of gold in this Comics Reporter interview with Sammy Harkham from last year on the occasion of the release of a collection of his comics called Everything Together.
Of particular interest to me are his thoughts on the value of laying out comics with many small panels per page:

For me, when I make my panels smaller, and there are more panels on the page, it’s easier for me to draw. It becomes more about pure information. […] When you only have two or three inches to do that in, it takes a lot the pressure off of making a nice drawing and just trying to make a readable drawing.
…
I don’t like to be too fussy. It also reminded me of the kind of storytelling I like in film or in literature. I have a preference for clean, declarative sentences, right? So if the comic can kind of mirror that — and I think that that one does in the sense that it’s very unadorned and very straight-forward — hopefully each panel gives you the information. As you work on that, you start realizing that emotional complexity doesn’t necessarily come out of composition or realistic faces. A realistic face trying to convey sadness may not be as effective as two dots and a sad mouth. A downward line. Then you realize that whole idea that Chris Ware talked about in ‘97 in his [The Comics Journal] interview of comics as music, all of the sudden you understand what he’s talking about in a whole new way, because it’s not, if you look at each at each individual panel as notes of music, any individual note isn’t necessarily complex, it’s the arrangement of those notes that creates complexity. So working on “The New Yorker Story” I started seeing that these were really simple images, really simple ideas, as individual panels. It’s the arrangement of these panels, these really easy-to-read images, that creates — hopefully — something richer.

dept-of-research-and-development:

There’s a lot of gold in this Comics Reporter interview with Sammy Harkham from last year on the occasion of the release of a collection of his comics called Everything Together.

Of particular interest to me are his thoughts on the value of laying out comics with many small panels per page:

For me, when I make my panels smaller, and there are more panels on the page, it’s easier for me to draw. It becomes more about pure information. […] When you only have two or three inches to do that in, it takes a lot the pressure off of making a nice drawing and just trying to make a readable drawing.

I don’t like to be too fussy. It also reminded me of the kind of storytelling I like in film or in literature. I have a preference for clean, declarative sentences, right? So if the comic can kind of mirror that — and I think that that one does in the sense that it’s very unadorned and very straight-forward — hopefully each panel gives you the information. As you work on that, you start realizing that emotional complexity doesn’t necessarily come out of composition or realistic faces. A realistic face trying to convey sadness may not be as effective as two dots and a sad mouth. A downward line. Then you realize that whole idea that Chris Ware talked about in ‘97 in his [The Comics Journal] interview of comics as music, all of the sudden you understand what he’s talking about in a whole new way, because it’s not, if you look at each at each individual panel as notes of music, any individual note isn’t necessarily complex, it’s the arrangement of those notes that creates complexity. So working on “The New Yorker Story” I started seeing that these were really simple images, really simple ideas, as individual panels. It’s the arrangement of these panels, these really easy-to-read images, that creates — hopefully — something richer.

50 notes

"I don’t plan or write ahead of time, having found through painful trial and error than anything I did script ended up dead on arrival. Instead I try to allow the feedback loop of staring at a blank page with few distractions other than my own memories, disappointments and yearnings direct a story and set a tone. I start at the top or in the middle of the page and whatever happens, happens. I keep vague notes but fundamentally I believe it’s very important for a story to find its own structure rather than the other way around — it’s the central tenet of Louis Sullivan’s architectural theory (his word, not mine) and I’ve found it to be true — really the only way to find the “shape of life” in an honest, awkward way that feels and hopefully is human. Our minds are already very organized things; the trick, I think, is simply to trust them."

Chris Ware (via dept-of-research-and-development)

(via dept-of-research-and-development)

57 notes

calliedraws:

Last semester I had to make the profile page of my website more formal for the sake of my grades, so now that I’m free from the requirement of the brief I decided to turn it into a comic strip because comics > formality.  

So, here it is. A little comic introduction to me for my Portfolio site. :) 

I wish my students would do this.

9 notes